about belgrade

Located at the confluence of the Sava and Danube rivers, Belgrade is one of the oldest cities in Europe and the capital of Serbia, with the population of approximately 1,732,000 (according to the 2011 census). It holds utmost importance in the field of traffic and transport as a road and railway hub, a port for river and air traffic, and a telecommunication center.

Belgrade as Singidunum

“Town of the Sings“, a Dacian tribe succeeded in the 3rd century BC by the Celts as masters of the settlement located in today’s Zvezdara and Višnjica… As “the White City”, dubbed by the Slavs who arrived to make it their home in the 6th and 7th century,  with the first written testimonial on the town named “Belgrade” originating from as early as 878...

Through its long history Belgrade has borne marks of being built and torn down by the Celts, the Roman and the Byzantine Empires, medieval Hungary, the Ottoman Empire, the Habsburg Monarchy, Serbs and “Yugoslavs”. Their “invisible” history is yet to be discovered…

Today’s complex of the Belgrade Fortress

An unparalleled museum of the city’s turbulent history consists of the old citadel (Upper and Lower Town) and Kalemegdan Park, which was until the 19th century merely a field under the rampart where the coming enemies were met in combat. Its name thus derives from Turkish words kale – the fort and megdan – the battlefield.

Belgrade as a port, a harbour at the confluence of the Sava and the Danube, was described by Constantine the Philosopher as the mysterious biblical Pishon (Genesis 2:11) – one of the four heavenly rivers. The Danube brings Belgrade the inspiration of the Strauss, while the Sava safeguards secrets of anglers and bohemians Deroko and Mika Alas, while its barges take it through brand new times…

The bridges let Belgrade step out from the Balkans and towards Central Europe, to become a city that gathers experiences from various cultures. The bridges give Belgrade Zemun with Srem region, Pančevo with Banat region…

Belgrade as a monument of nature, whose wealth of green includes Kalemegdan, Tašmajdan, Avala, Topčider, Zvezdara, Košutnjak, Ada Ciganlija… Within the thick forest of buildings, skyscrapers and boulevards stand genuine reserves of nature, such as the Botanical Garden and the Great War Island.

Belgrade as the capital of Balkan culture

Belgrade as an artistic pavilion hosting FEST, BELEF, BITEF, Joy of Europe, BEMUS, October Salon, Book Fair, the international manifestations of accomplishment in arts, which to Belgrade meant life in all political and social settings.

Belgrade as a Christian city, in which despot Stefan Lazarević reconstituted the Church of the Holy Mother of God, noting in the charter: “Upon arrival, I found the most mesmerizing place since the ancient times, the great city of Belgrade, accidentally demolished and deserted. I rebuilt it and devoted it to the Holy Virgin”.

Belgrade life is falling in love and embarking on adventure, going out on the town, meeting and parting, being romantic and pathetic, passionate and youthful, rushing through the busy traffic.

Belgrade as an intricate network of alleys, dark passages and underground corridors - lagums, cobble stoned and macadamized roads, fences and cottages – relics not right fully treasured at times. They are found everywhere, invisible to many, tucked in between buildings and skyscrapers, boulevards and parks, as silent reminders that Belgrade was once more than a fortress; it was also a small town, a budding township and a bleak Turkish borough....